Cuddle Party

Apr. 24th, 2019 12:19 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Everyone needs contact comfort sometimes. Not everyone has ample opportunities for this in facetime. So here is a chance for a cuddle party in cyberspace. Virtual cuddling can help people feel better.

We have a
cuddle room that comes with fort cushions, fort frames, sheets for draping, and a weighted blanket. A nest full of colorful egg pillows sits in one corner. There is a basket of grooming brushes, hairbrushes, and styling combs. A bin holds textured pillows. There is a big basket of craft supplies along with art markers, coloring pages, and blank paper. The kitchen has a popcorn machine. Labels are available to mark dietary needs, recipe ingredients, and level of spiciness. Here is the bathroom, open to everyone. There is a lawn tent and an outdoor hot tub. Bathers should post a sign for nude or clothed activity. Come snuggle up!

In the interest of promoting the concept of introvert parties, we've decided to start adding more communal features.  You know how some folks just like to sit around and read together?  You can do that here by sharing a link to an online story.  I'm rereading "The Catch."  If this doesn't turn people off invasive species, nothing will.
  It's one of my all-time-favorite science fiction stories.

Free E-book of Native Bees

Apr. 23rd, 2019 10:53 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
 Read about North American bee species.  This book has gorgeous artwork.

Tuesday Yardening

Apr. 23rd, 2019 06:11 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is cloudy, mild, and calm.

Round One -- We shoveled ash out of the firepit and dumped it in the prairie garden.  Then we picked up sticks from the grass wall in the south lot toward the house.

Round Two -- I dumped out three bags of topsoil in the hollow beyond the patio. It's not really topsoil though, it's full of wood chips in muck.  >_<  Oh well.  I threw down some grass and clover seed; hopefully it will sprout in that mess.  At least the hollow is less deep now. 

The cherry trees are blooming in the orchard.
[syndicated profile] science_at_nasa_feed

Posted by ckaiser

Following National Academy of Sciences recommendations, advice from the NASA Advisory Council, and subsequent unanimous agreement from NASA’s science leadership, the agency has established an independent Planetary Protection Review Board to review established guidelines for planetary protection and recommend any updates that are required. Planetary protection policies are designed to protect solar system bodies from contamination by Earth life, and to protect Earth from possible harm from potential biological sources beyond our planet.

News Article Type: 
Published: 
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 16:06

Bluejay

Apr. 23rd, 2019 02:49 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
 I just saw a bluejay in the forest garden.  :D  There are two robins out there also, bathing in the runoff.
[syndicated profile] badastronomy_feed

Posted by Phil Plait

A few years ago I was watching a documentary of some kind or another, and they were talking about something they said was a big concern: huge amounts of methane buried beneath the Siberian permafrost that was starting to leak out. I don’t remember much about the show, except they were clearly saying this was a catastrophe waiting to happen.

I’m not a climate scientist, but I have some science background, and could see this sounded like a big problem. Since that time I’ve seen more and more about this online, and every time I hear about it it seems to be bigger, more devastating, with more breathless coverage every time.

But … is it really a problem?

To my surprise (and tentative relief), it’s not nearly as bad as these shows claimed, though some folks still play it up.

So, what does the science say?

Methane hydrate structure (left) is a cage of interconnected water molecules trapping a methane molecule inside. If exposed to heat, the methane hydrate ice burns. Credit: Beauchamp (structure), USGS (fire)

Methane hydrate structure (left) is a cage of interconnected water molecules trapping a methane molecule inside. If exposed to heat, the methane hydrate ice burns. Credit: Beauchamp (structure), USGS...

This whole thing centers on methane hydrates. It’s an interesting bit of chemistry, where, under enough pressure, water molecules combine with methane to form a weird structure that acts like a cage surrounding methane molecules, trapping them inside. It forms if you have methane under cold water at depths of about 500 meters or so.

Those conditions are not common, but do happen along continental slopes, where the continental plates meet the sea. During the last ice age sea levels were lower (the water was locked up in ice), so in many regions those slopes were grasslands. It was cold in the northern regions, tundra, but animals fed on the grass there. When they died, their bodies were preserved in the cold.

Global locations of methane hydrate deposits, almost always on continental slopes. Credit: Council of Canadian Academies (2008), based on data from Kvenvolden and Rogers (2005) / Global Carbon Project

Global locations of methane hydrate deposits, almost always on continental slopes. Credit: Council of Canadian Academies (2008), based on data from Kvenvolden and Rogers (2005) / Global Carbon Project

Eventually the glaciers retreated, sea levels rose, and water inundated those areas. Bacteria slowly ate the remains, creating methane, and under the cold water of the coasts this formed methane hydrates. These hydrates are stable as long as a) they are under the pressure of water above them, and 2) that water is cold.

There’s the problem: The waters there aren’t as cold as they once were due to global warming. We’re seeing some places releasing that methane, into the water or, in some places where we’re losing permafrost due to warming, into the air.

Here’s the problem: Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas. Molecule for molecule, it’s about 25 times better at trapping heat than CO2! As methane is released in the air, it accelerates warming, and that means more methane is released, and that means it gets even warmer, and … feedback loop.

Methane bubbles up from sediment off the Virginia coastline in the US. Credit: NOAA OKEANOS Explorer Program, 2013 ROV Shakedown and Field Trials

Methane bubbles up from sediment off the Virginia coastline in the US. Credit: NOAA OKEANOS Explorer Program, 2013 ROV Shakedown and Field Trials

Now, here is where our story diverges. Some folks — like ones who run less-than-scientifically-based YouTube channels, and some TV networks who love this sort of story, like the one I saw a few years ago — say this is a massive and inevitable catastrophe, even calling these deposits “methane bombs.” We’re doomed, they say, because this feedback loop will eat itself faster and faster, and in a few years we’ll have global warming ramping up so rapidly that there’s nothing we can do.

Other folks — scientists, for example, people who have dedicated their careers to studying this — have a slightly different story. Methane release from methane hydrates is a concern, they say, but not necessarily a catastrophic one. It depends on our own actions.

You can guess where I land with this now. Psssst: science.

Peter Sinclair, who runs the Climate Crocks website, which debunks climate science denial, has a great page about this. He interviewed scientists who study this and put together a video that explains the situation really well.

The first couple of minutes show the problem, and what the catastrophists are claiming, and the rest goes into why this isn’t an “OhMyGodWe’reAllGonnaDie!” situation.

Basically, as geologist Carolyn Ruppel says, getting methane hydrates to release their gas rapidly is actually really hard; the reaction needs energy to occur, so it steals heat from its surroundings. That makes things colder, which slows the process! So it’s very hard to get a runaway reaction.

As she and climatologist James Hanson point out in the video, the real accelerator of this is our own dumping of CO2 in the air that’s warming the planet. If we can slow that down, then the waters in the arctic won’t warm as much, and there won’t be much release of the methane in the first place.

That leads to an interesting irony. More than one, in fact. My friend and climatologist Michael Mann explains in a supplementary video Sinclair posted:


So, do you see the irony?

Catastrophists in general accept the consensus that the planet is warming up and humans — us, you and me — are to blame, but then they drop the science to exaggerate the problem. That’s called cherry-picking, and it’s a no-no; you can’t just pick and choose which bits of science to believe. That’s the first irony; the catastrophists use the same sort of science denial climate science deniers sometimes employ!

The second irony is that this sort of over-amping of the climate fears actually leads to more denial! After all, if there’s nothing we can do to prevent catastrophe, well then, smoke ‘em if you’ve got ‘em. Burn all the fossil fuels you want, dig up more, whatever. It doesn’t matter anyway.

But it does. If we can mitigate the amount of global warming we’re causing, then the permafrost methane deposits won’t be that big a problem. But that’s only true if we take the reins and reduce our carbon footprints. If we don’t, then yeah, those methane deposits will indeed be a problem, but only because we didn’t take action.

In northern Siberia, lakes are scattered around Omulyakhskaya (top) and Khromskaya (bottom) Bays. Melting permafrost supplies water to the lakes, which are also the sites of methane release. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory / Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon

In northern Siberia, lakes are scattered around Omulyakhskaya (top) and Khromskaya (bottom) Bays. Melting permafrost supplies water to the lakes, which are also the sites of methane release. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory / Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using Landsat data provided by the United States Geological Survey

So the catastrophe-mongering is a self-fulfilling prophecy. And weirdly one that plays right into the hands of climate science deniers, because, as Mann says, the fossil fuel interests can say, hey, CO2 isn’t a problem, it’s the methane, so let us grab all the fossil fuels we can!

If you worry about these methane bombs like I did years ago, then your best bet is to do what you can to get us off fossil fuel. There are lots of ways to do that as an individual if you have the means (for example, I’ve installed solar panels on my home, and over the years have done so for three homes now altogether), but there’s one way that exceeds all the others. And it’s really, really easy.

Vote.

The only thing — literally, the only thing — keeping us from moving off fossil fuels rapidly is people in the fossil fuel industry purposely sowing misinformation about the dangers of greenhouse gas emissions … and the politicians who both are enthralled to them and further empower them.

Vote. It can literally save the world.

Monday Update 4-22-19

Apr. 22nd, 2019 08:19 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
These are some posts from the later part of last week in case you missed them:
Poem: "By the People's Voices"
Poem: "The Consequences of Their Own Neglect"
Sunday Yardening
Poem: "Faces in a Mosaic Mirror"
Poem: "The Blue Bird of Happiness"
Poem: "To Repair the Damage of the Lumberman"
Emotional Intimacy Question: Positives
Wednesday Yardening
A Bad Take on Going Nonverbal
Hard Things


 Look on the sale page to find all the sponsored poems.

The April [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam was this past weekend. See what I wrote.

I posted about the Notre Dame Cathedral fire and an update afterwards.


Poetry in Microfunding:

There are two open epics.

"Learning the Vocation" belongs to Path of the Paladins. Shahana and company play games in the common room.

"A Cave Swarming with Strange Forms of Life" belongs to Polychrome Heroics: Iron Horses and has 20 new verses. Kenzie tells Pretty Ears what is bothering him.


Weather here has been mild with occasional rain. Seen at the birdfeeders this week: a flock of grackles, a small flock of sparrows, a small flock of mourning doves, two pairs of house finches, a pair of cardinals, a pair of goldfinches in summer plumage, a brown thrasher, a robin, and a red-winged blackbird. Currently blooming: violas, daffodils, hyacinths, purple grape hyacinths, forsythia, violets, tulips, redbud tree, pear tree.  

Feathering the Nest

Apr. 22nd, 2019 08:05 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer is hosting Feathering the Nest today for nonsexual intimacies.  Leave prompts, get ficlets! 

The Art of the Playlist

Apr. 22nd, 2019 05:41 pm
[syndicated profile] sfwa_feed

Posted by Editor

by Paul Jessup

Ever since I first started taking writing seriously as a teenager, I’ve always written to music. Back then it was a bit more difficult than it is now, in the days of Spotify and gigantic playlists that can stretch on for hours or even days. Back in those days I would make mix tapes for my writing, each story and scene would get its own mixtape of songs that I felt carried the tone and the emotion of what I’m trying to convey.

There was a bit of art to it, back then. I wanted it to flow correctly, so I could keep on writing without pause or interruption. I would take songs that had a certain harmony and made sure they crescendo at the right time, following the narrative rise and rise and rise of how scenes and stories are constructed. I would also take a key song, one that surmised the tone and narrative themes I wanted to express within a story. Or maybe a song that inspired me, that gave me character names and sharp images of what could happen within a text.

Some things have changed these days, others haven’t. You don’t have to listen through each song when creating a playlist, as you do with a mixtape.  You don’t have to worry about crescendo and rhythm and pitch that matches an exact narrative, you can just fit them together and put it on random. You’re not limited to an hour or so on a physical medium, you can have music stretch on and on for hours or even days.

I’ve taken to construct playlists for themes, for scenes, for characters, for entire novels. For me, the emotional power of the music is the most important part. I want an emotional harmony, one that rings true with whatever I’m working on.

For short stories? It’s simple. Sometimes I only use one song on repeat and that’s it. For the short story The Music of Ghosts (published in Interzone), I just listened to Hans Zimmer’s Time, from the Inception soundtrack. Other times I’ll just have a long generic writing playlist, that seems to work fine when I don’t have a specific thing in mind.

Though, that one has a bit of a drawback. If you put it on random, and it switches from a beautiful, melancholy song to a Wagnerian battle ode with loud drums and singing? Well, that shocks me right out of the story and I have to try and find my way back in. It’s why I rarely use a large playlist and prefer to craft tiny playlists that work for a certain mood, scene, or inspire a story or a character.

Back when I was doing mixtapes I had to have music with lyrics in it. Tori Amos’s Under the Pink and Boys for Pele were favorites. As well as Sonic Youth and Tool. These days, however, I need the music to either be instrumental or in a language I don’t understand. I put on a lot of post-rock, like Godspeed, You! Black Emperor, A Silver Mount Zion, and Mogwai.  These swelling walls of guitars contain the exact emotional frequency I feed on while writing.

Other times I’ll mix it and match it all with soundtracks to video games, movies, and tv shows. Again, I want something that carries emotional weight and seems to fit together with how I picture the world of the story and the characters inside.

It’s a tricky thing, to get all of these right. I’ve found that if my playlist doesn’t quite work, the stories suffer and tend to be a frustrating affair. It’s taken a lot of experimentation through the decades I’ve been doing this to get it just right. And even still, I find myself tweaking the playlists over and over again, just to get that right sound. That right emotional feeling.

When I hit it, the writing becomes poetry and moves to the music. Like a dance, the words stepping in time to the orchestral summoning. If it’s bad? The words clunk and clatter, I find it hard to concentrate, and I end up starting over and over and over again.

Not a perfect process, mind you. But it’s one that works for me, and something I think can help just about everyone else out there with their writing.

•••

Paul Jessup is a critically acclaimed/award-winning author of strange and slippery fiction. His novel Close Your Eyes is currently out from the Apex Book Company. You can visit him at pauljessup.com or on Twitter at @pauljessup.

The post The Art of the Playlist appeared first on SFWA.

Goldfinches

Apr. 22nd, 2019 12:22 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
I have two male goldfinches in the forest garden right now, one on the hopper feeder and one on the thistle feeder, both in their summer coats.  :D  In winter they are a drab olive, but in summer their bodies are brilliant yellow. They still have some smudges on their shoulders, but they're mostly changed over.  So cute! 
[syndicated profile] badastronomy_feed

Posted by Phil Plait

Remember when you were a kid and a friend told you that gum was indigestible, and if you swallowed it the gum would stay in your stomach for seven years?

Yeah, that’s not true. OK, gum is indigestible, but it passes through you just like any other thing your body can’t tear apart and use on the molecular level.

While, this urban legend — like so many others —turns out to be false, on a galactic scale it is true. Kinda. In this case your stomach is the galaxy, and the wads of chewing gum are smaller galactic companions. Our galaxy ate them, and the undigested bits still roam the Milky Way.

OK, enough with the food analogies (as much as I want to make one about a candy bar named after our galaxy). What’s really going on?

The structure of the Milky Way: A flattened disk with spiral arms (seen face-on, left, and edge-on, right), with a central bulge, a halo, and more than 150 globular clusters. The location of the Sun about halfway out is indicated.

The structure of the Milky Way: A flattened disk with spiral arms (seen face-on, left, and edge-on, right), with a central bulge, a halo, and more than 150 globular clusters. The location of the Sun about halfway out is indicated. Credit: Left: NASA/JPL-Caltech; right: ESA; layout: ESA/ATG medialab

Our Milky Way is a spiral galaxy: A central bulge of stars with a flat disk around it, surrounded by a halo of stars stretching out for hundreds of thousands of light years. The Sun sits in that disk, about 26,000 light years from the center, putting it halfway to the edge of the disk, which is 100,000 light years in diameter.

We have a lot of companion objects orbiting us, too. Some are relatively small but decent-sized galaxies like the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, and some are even smaller and fainter dwarf galaxies. Over 160 globular clusters also orbit the galactic center, each a self-contained ball of a hundred thousand stars (and glorious through even a small telescope).

Here’s a fun fact: We used to have more. But, over its lifetime, the Milky Way has eaten quite a few of these smaller companions, growing in size each time. This can happen if the orbit of the companion takes it too close to the Milky Way, sometimes even passing right through our disk. Stars are small and very far apart, so they rarely physically collide… but the combined gravity of a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way is literally a destructive force. It can rip apart these smaller galaxies and clusters, pulling them apart like, well, chewing gum stretched between your fingers.

Sometimes the companion gets completely torn apart, its stars and gas merging with our own. Sometimes though it may have a dense core which can survive — it’s thought that many globulars clusters are in fact cores of old eaten galaxies like this, spat out of the Milky Way like indigestible gum*.

But digesting a galaxy takes time. A lot more than seven years, of course; more like hundreds of million of years or more. That means that there could be stars moving around our galaxy still on the same paths as their original galaxy or cluster. And in fact we’ve found some of these stellar streams; the Sagittarius Dwarf galaxy stream is the most well-known, but others exist.

Many others: A team of astronomers have just announced the existence of quite a few more. In a series of papers they describe how they found them and their properties, and it’s very cool.

Stars in some of the stellar streams recently discovered using Gaia data superposed on a map of the galaxy. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC

Stars in some of the stellar streams recently discovered using Gaia data superposed on a map of the galaxy. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC

They used Gaia, a European Space Agency satellite that, for several years now, has been mapping the positions, motions, and colors of well over a billion stars in the galaxy. Using a very sophisticated method of parsing the data, they modeled the four-dimensional orbits of the stars (three in space plus time), looking for others stars on similar paths through space. They had to account for all kinds of subtle effects (like the shape and mass distribution of stars in the Milky Way) to make sure they got this right. If they found a stream, for example, one thing they checked for was the abundances of various elements in the stars, under the assumption that if they all formed in the same globular cluster (say) they should have the same relative abundances of those elements.

In all they found over a dozen such streams popping out of the data, which is astonishing. The Milky Way is a glutton!

An interesting thing about these streams is that most of them don’t seem to have any other objects associated with them. If they come from dwarf galaxies or globular clusters, those original objects apparently are long gone. One major exception is a stream they named Fimbulthul: It is clearly coming from the massive globular cluster Omega Centauri! That’s very cool, because it’s been speculated for a long time that Omega Cen may be the leftover core of a dwarf galaxy, and so should have a stream of stars coming off it. This would seem to confirm that.

The orbits of streams of stars in Gaia data as if you are looking down on the center of the Milky Way. The scale is in kiloparsecs (1 kpc = 3,260 light years). Credit: Ibata et al.

The orbits of streams of stars in Gaia data as if you are looking down on the center of the Milky Way. The scale is in kiloparsecs (1 kpc = 3,260 light years). Credit: Ibata et al.

Also interestingly, more than half of the streams they found orbit the galaxy retrograde, in the opposite sense as the rest of the stars in the disk. Most globular clusters orbit prograde, in the same sense as stars in the disk, so what gives? The astronomers aren’t sure, but suspect it may be that it’s easier to pick stars orbiting backwards out of a crowded background of stars orbiting forwards, so those streams are easier to spot. Further refinements to their software might clear that up. But if it’s a real effect it’s telling us something about the Milky Way and the objects around it… but what, exactly isn’t known yet.

One other thing I want to mention are the names they gave the streams. Slidr, Sylgr, Ylgr, Fimulthul, Svöl, Fjörm, Gjöll, and Leiptr — all of which were discovered in a recent software upgrade which refined their search method, plus Phlegethon, discovered previously — are names of rivers in Norse mythology, rivers that existed before the world did. How apt! And a lovely thought, given how old some of these streams must be. Many of them very likely were parts of galaxies and clusters long before our Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago.

I’ve written about Gaia many times before, and how it’s revolutionizing our understanding of the galaxy — the distance to Polaris, how far away the Pleiades are, whether the iconic star Albireo is a true binary or not (spoiler alert: it isn’t), and revealing hidden structures in the Milky Way, including stellar streams. I have to admit that when I wrote that last article just a few months ago I wasn’t expecting Gaia data to reveal so many more leftover cosmic cannibal meals.

We’ve lived in this galactic neighborhood for billons of years, and finally, after all that time, we’re really starting to get to know it.


*OK, I lied; I wasn’t done with the food analogies.

Poem: "By the People's Voices"

Apr. 21st, 2019 11:22 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is spillover from the March 6, 2019 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] mashfanficchick. It also fills the "short temper" square in my 2-28-19 card for the Meet Ugly Bingo Fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Officer Pink thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the January 8, 2019 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by discussions with [personal profile] dialecticdreamer. It also fills the "masks" square in my 9-30-18 card for the Fall Bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Mercedes thread of the Polychrome Heroics series, following "When Opportunity Meets with Planning." Read that first or this won't make much sense.

Warning: This poem features intense and controversial topics. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. It includes consensual impersonation, a bank robbery, a domestic abuse victim, extreme malfeasance from the bank including the endangerment of said victim, the bank manager is an obnoxious dick, random customers choosing NOT to interfere with the bank robbery, soaking someone with a watergun, threatening to use superpowers for minor genital injury, psychedelic use of superpowers, the banks' only public restroom does not meet ADA standards, and also has a camera, vandalism via superpowers, the vault has WAY more money than it should, hiding out in an underground bunker, cramming calories, faceplanting anyway, and other challenges. There are no casualties in the bank job. If these are touchy topics for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

Read more... )

Sunday Yardening

Apr. 21st, 2019 06:26 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is sunny, warm, and calm.  It's the first chance I've had to get out and do yardwork since I bought the previous round of plants.

Round One -- First I put the goddess statue back into the goddess garden.  Then I planted a silver thyme and a creeping thyme around that.  

Next I planted 6 marigolds and 6 snapdragons in the barrel garden.  :D

EDIT 4/21/19: Round Two -- I planted 6 marigolds in the septic garden.  I planted 6 pinks in two pots and a pineapple mint in another pot.  Then I watered the new plants.  Everything from the most recent shopping trip has now been planted.  \o/  As it is now dark, I am done for the night.

I still have other yard stuff to do later.  I have 3 bags of topsoil to fill the hollow near the patio.  I also have a few bulbs and packets of seeds to plant somewhere.  But all that is less urgent than live plants.

Half-Price Sale in Polychrome Heroics

Apr. 21st, 2019 05:53 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is the last day of the half-price sale in Polychrome Heroics.  If you still wish to participate in that, please take a look at what's left and make your selections. 

Poem: "Faces in a Mosaic Mirror"

Apr. 21st, 2019 03:46 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This is the freebie for the April [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] librarygeek. It also fills the "bully" square in my 4-1-19 card for the School Days fest.

Read more... )

Creative Jam

Apr. 20th, 2019 12:21 am
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
The April [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam is now open with a theme of "Identity Crisis."  Come give us prompts, or claim some for your own inspiration.


What I Have Written

"Faces in a Mosaic Mirror" is the freebie.


From My Prompts

ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Thanks to a donation from [personal profile] fuzzyred, there are 11 new verses in "A Cave Swarming with Strange Forms of Life."   Kenzie tells Pretty Ears about the attack.

Poem: "The Blue Bird of Happiness"

Apr. 19th, 2019 06:00 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the November 6, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] gingicat. It also fills the "blue bird of happiness" square in my 11-5-19 card for the Family Ties Bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] fuzzyred. It belongs to the Mercedes thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is spillover from the January 8, 2019 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] siliconshaman. It also fills the "giant anything" square in my 9-30-18 card for the Fall Bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] fuzzyred. It belongs to the Big One thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )

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